devoid


devoid
devoid, void, destitute are comparable when they are followed by of and mean showing entire want or lack.
Devoid stresses the absence or the nonpossession of a particular quality, character," or tendency
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I was not devoid of capacity or application— Gibbon

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they will steal from you before your very face, so devoid are they of all shame— Hudson

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a human being devoid of hope is the most terrible object in the world— Heiser

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Void (see also EMPTY 1) usually implies freedom from the slightest trace, vestige, tinge, or taint of something
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a man void of honor

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a conscience void of offence— Acts 24:16

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a drama which, with all its preoccupation with sex, is really void of sexual interest— Shaw

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Destitute stresses deprivation or privation; it therefore is seldom used with reference to what is evil or undesirable
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a domestic life destitute of any hallowing charm— George Eliot

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men of genius . . . wholly destitute of any proper sense of form— J. R. Lowell

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no woman ... so totally destitute of the sentiment of religion— J. R. Green

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Analogous words: barren, *bare: lacking, wanting (see LACK vb): *empty

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Devoid — De*void , a. [See {Devoid}, v. t.] 1. Void; empty; vacant. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. Destitute; not in possession; with of; as, devoid of sense; devoid of pity or of pride. [1913 Webster] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Devoid — Studio album by Dark Lunacy Released 2000 Genre …   Wikipedia

  • devoid of — not having (something usual or expected) : completely without (something) He is devoid of (any) ambition. [=he has no ambition] The landscape seems to be completely devoid of life. • • • Main Entry: ↑devoid …   Useful english dictionary

  • devoid — meaning ‘lacking’, is followed by of and is predicative in position, i.e. it comes after the word it refers to, with a linking verb: • Many of the pieces for middle aged women in Welsh drama are devoid of humour Daily Post (Liverpool), 2007 …   Modern English usage

  • devoid — ► ADJECTIVE (devoid of) ▪ entirely lacking in. ORIGIN from Old French devoidier cast out …   English terms dictionary

  • Devoid — De*void , v. t. [OE. devoiden to leave, OF. desvuidier, desvoidier, to empty out. See {Void}.] To empty out; to remove. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • devoid — I adjective bare, barren, bereft of, blank, bleak, deficient, denuded of, deprived of, deserted, desolate, destitute of, empty, empty of, found wanting, ill furnished, ill provided, ill stored, impotent, in default of, in the absence of, in want… …   Law dictionary

  • devoid of — index insufficient Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • devoid — c.1400, shortening of devoided, pp. of obsolete verb devoiden to remove, void, vacate (c.1300), from O.Fr. desvuidier (12c., Mod.Fr. dévider) to empty out, flush game from, unwind, let loose (an arrow), from des out, away + voider to empty, from… …   Etymology dictionary

  • devoid — [adj] empty, wanting bare, barren, bereft, deficient, denuded, destitute, free from, innocent, lacking, needed, sans*, unprovided with, vacant, void, without; concepts 483,485 Ant. complete, filled, full …   New thesaurus


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